MariaDB

Giving MariaDB its sea legs

MariaDB is a relational database founded by MySQL founder Monty Widenius. With a free basic version and a paid, enterprise-ready counterpart, MariaDB sits at the forefront of open-source database software, liberating companies from proprietary databases so they can rapidly develop innovative, customer-facing applications. MariaDB needed a new website to publicize and represent their enterprise-oriented incarnation – which uncovered the need for an entirely new brand.

Scope

  • Brand
  • Campaign
  • Digital
  • Experiential

Challenge

MariaDB was best known as a free open-source database embraced by a fervent developer community. The free offering (MariaDB.org) received most of the search engine traffic and general awareness; meanwhile, the enterprise-ready solution needed to escape from its shadow, which meant building an enterprise-caliber website and brand to compete with the likes of Oracle.

Approach

Discovery sessions with key stakeholders helped us  differentiate MariaDB robust, enterprise-ready product from a highly competitive market and their free developer brand. The theme of ‘Open’ set the tone: not just open-source, but open to community, possibilities, freedom, collaboration, and flexibility. The fluid visual language – an expansive ocean – reinforced minute connections and infinite variability, while a modern evolution of their sea lion logo, a new color palette, and fresh brand elements create a living, breathing marine world. We then built their website to tell their story, reimagined their materials, offices, and events, and made a splash with campaigns to build trust and position MariaDB as a leader in solving the world’s business problems.

Impact

MariaDB is now equipped with the strong position and visual brand to define themselves as a key player against their well-known competitors. Templates, campaigns, videos, conferences, and other collateral support MariaDB in their leadership position in enterprise database management, allowing the company to stand on its own from its free counterpart.